Jasper, Brecciated

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Jasper is typically about 80% quartz (silicon dioxide) and 20% other materials. Jasper is typically found in veins and cracks in volcanic rocks, often together with chalcedony and agate. The cracks in volcanic rocks filled out by jasper often form during tectonic (earthquake and movement) activity. Tectonic activity can go on for a long time, the cracks can reopen again, the jasper can be shattered, and the voids in between the shattered rock can be healed by being filled with more jasper or other material. This is how brecciated jasper forms. Sometimes chalcedony and macrocrystalline quartz of different colors fills the voids in the shattered rock.

Some of the most notable deposits are sourced from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Madagascar, Mexico, Russia, Uruguay, Venezuela and the United States of America, including Arizona, Arkansas, California, Idaho, Oregon, Texas and Washington.